Friday, 30 January 2015

Thursday, 29 January 2015

Wednesday, 28 January 2015

Tuesday, 27 January 2015

Monday, 26 January 2015

Saturday, 24 January 2015

Saturday, 17 January 2015

Mr Mead in the garden shop

Mr Mead in the garden shop, an illustration by John Vernon Lord in Mr Mead and His Garden, Jonathan Cape, 1974

Friday, 16 January 2015

Thursday, 15 January 2015

Entrance to the former Primary School in Ditching (now the museum)


Entrance to the former Primary School in Ditching (now the museum), 
a decorated archway during a Horticultural Society weekend, an illustration by John Vernon Lord in 
Red Roughs and Copper Kettles; a History of the Ditching Horticultural Society by Richard Morley, 1990.

Wednesday, 14 January 2015

North Star field in Ditching


North Star field in Ditching, an illustration by John Vernon Lord in 
Red Roughs and Copper Kettles; a History of the Ditching Horticultural Society by Richard Morley, 1990.

Wednesday, 7 January 2015

'The Eagle and Jackdaw'

'The Eagle and Jackdaw', an illustration by John Vernon Lord 
in Aesop's Fables, Jonathan Cape, 1989, page 87.

The text:

The Eagle and the Jackdaw
An eagle flew down from the top of a high Rock and settled upon the Back of a Lamb; and then instantly flying up into the Air again, bore his bleating Prize aloft in his Pounces. A Jackdaw, who sate upon an Elm, and beheld this Exploit, resolv’d to imitate it; so flying down upon the back of a Ram and intangling his Claws in the Wool, he fell a chattering and attempting to fly; By which means he drew the Observation of the Shepherd upon him, who finding his Feet hamper’d in the Fleece of the Ram, easily made a Prey of him, and gave them to his Boys for their Sport and Diversion.

Moral:  Those who try to match the powerful will usually overreach themselves and  get teased for their efforts.

Text: Samuel Croxall (134, 1722).

Selected parallels: Babrius 137. Aristophanes Aves 652. Caxton Remicius 1. La Fontaine 2/16. L’Estrange 1/72. Chambry 5. Perry 2. TMI J2413.3.

note: Croxall's crow has been substituted for a Jackdaw.

Tuesday, 6 January 2015

'The Kid and the Wolf'

'The Kid and the Wolf' an illustration by John Vernon Lord in Aesop's Fables, 
Jonathan Cape, 1984, page 6.

The text:

The Kid on the Roof of a House and the Wolf
A KID standing on the roof of a house, out of harm's way, saw a Wolf passing by: and immediately began to taunt and revile him. The Wolf, looking up, said: “Sirrah! I hear thee:  yet it is not thou who mockest me, but the roof on which thou art standing."

Moral: The advantage of time and place often emboldens the weak to defy the strong.

Text: George Fyler Townsend (p47, 1868).
Selected parallels: Babrius 96. Chambry 106. Perry 98. TMI J974. 

Monday, 5 January 2015

'The Stag at the Pond'

'The Stag at the Pond', an illustration by John Vernon Lord in Aesop's Fables, 
Jonathan Cape, 1984, page 72.

The text:
A Stag that had been drinking at a clear Spring, saw himself in the Water; and pleas’d with the Prospect, stood afterwards for some Time contemplating and surveying his Shape and Features, from Head to Foot. Ah! says he, what a glorious pair of branching horns are there! How gracefully do those Antlers hang over my Forehead , and give an agreeable Turn to my whole Face! If some other Parts of my Body were but proportionable to them, I’d turn my back to no body; but I’ve a Sett of such Legs as really make me asham’d to see them. People may talk what they may please of their Conveniences, and what great Need we stand in of them upon several Occasions; but, for my Part, I find them so very slender, and unsightly, that I had e’en as lief have none at all. While he was giving himself these Airs, he was alarm’d with the noise of some Huntsmen, and a Pack of Dogs, that had been just laid on upon the Scent, and were making towards him. Away he flies in some Consternation, and, bound nimbly over the Plain; threw Dogs and Men at a vast Distance behind him. After which, taking a very thick Copse, he had the ill Fortune to be entangled by his Horns in a Thicket; where he was held fast, till the Hounds came in and pull’d him down. Finding now, how it was like to be with him, in the Pangs of Death, he is said to have utter’d these Words: Unhappy creature that I am! I am too late convinc’d, that, what I prided myself so much in, has been the Cause of my Undoing; and what I so much despis’d, was the only Thing that could have sav’d me.

Moral: Look to what is useful before the ornamental, for what is valuable is too often underrated.

Text: Samuel Croxall (8, 1722).

Selected parallels: Babrius 43. Phaedrus 1/12. Caxton Romulus 3/7. 1. La Fontaine 6/9. L’Estrange 1/43. Chambry 102. Perry 74. TMI L461.

Sunday, 4 January 2015

St Margaret of Antioch, Ditching Church

St Margaret of Antioch, Ditching Church, an illustration by John Vernon Lord, circa early 1990s.

Saturday, 3 January 2015

Ditching Fair programme 2010

Ditching Fair programme 2010, an illustration by John Vernon Lord, Ditching Fair, 2010.

Friday, 2 January 2015

Ditchling Fair programme cover 2012


Ditchling Fair programme cover, 2012, celebrating the 700th Fair in the village, 
an illustration by John Vernon Lord, 2012.

Thursday, 1 January 2015

Mother Goose

A programme illustration by John Vernon Lord for a production of Mother Goose 
by the Ditching Players in 2007 (showing a view of the village High Street).

Wednesday, 31 December 2014

Scorper (back cover)


Scorper, a novel by Rob Magnuson Smith with illustrated back cover by John Vernon Lord
Designed by Dan Mogford, Granta, 2014.

Tuesday, 30 December 2014

Scorper (front cover)


Scorper, a novel by Rob Magnuson Smith with illustrated front cover by John Vernon Lord
Designed by Dan Mogford, Granta, 2014.

Monday, 29 December 2014

'The Tyger'

'The Tyger', a poem by William Blake' , illustrated by John Vernon Lord 
in The Song That Sings The Bird, Poems for Young Children, chosen by Ruth Craft, 
Collins, 1989, page 119.

The Text:

Tyger Tyger, burning bright, 
In the forests of the night; 
What immortal hand or eye, 
Could frame thy fearful symmetry? 

In what distant deeps or skies. 
Burnt the fire of thine eyes? 
On what wings dare he aspire? 
What the hand, dare seize the fire? 

And what shoulder, & what art, 
Could twist the sinews of thy heart? 
And when thy heart began to beat, 
What dread hand? & what dread feet? 

What the hammer? what the chain, 
In what furnace was thy brain? 
What the anvil? what dread grasp, 
Dare its deadly terrors clasp! 

When the stars threw down their spears 
And water'd heaven with their tears: 
Did he smile his work to see? 
Did he who made the Lamb make thee? 

Tyger Tyger burning bright, 
In the forests of the night: 
What immortal hand or eye, 
Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?